Kalanchoe luciae

Kalanchoe Luciae

There are over 125 species of Kalanchoes and some of them can reach an impressive height of six metres.

Joycelyn recently took some cuttings of the Kalanchoe blossfeldiana in our office and are still patiently waiting for it to sprout properly.

It will probably only reach a height of 30 cm which is nothing compared to the Kalanchoe luciae growing for Small House / Big Garden in the US!

What is the tallest flower you have grown?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

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Blazing Autumn Colours for Your Garden

Jersey Plants at Primrose

We’re excited to be teaming up with Jersey Plants Direct, whose beautiful autumn plants are available now on our website, with free delivery!

Summer’s fading light can easily make the colours in our gardens look a bit dull. With our new handpicked Jersey Plants Direct range, blazing autumn colours can easily enrich your garden for one last glorious time this year.

By planting brightly coloured bedding plants, such as wallflowers or pansies, you’ve got your garden’s autumnal needs covered.

Autumnal bedding plants not floating your boat? We have many more plants available on our site, including pond plantsexoticsrosesfruit treesspring bulbs and many more!

Of course there are also our 980+ planters to complement your new flowers!

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Office Kalanchoe Cuttings

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana in a potWe have a whole jungle of houseplants at the Primrose office, including several specimens of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana – a very common succulent that you might recognise by its tiny, brightly-coloured blooms (common name ‘Flaming Katy’).

You can see it looking pretty in a zinc planter on your right.

Kalanchoe cuttings in water

Our kalanchoes’ blooms have all withered away, but they’re still growing rapidly and, to be honest, the biggest of them has been getting tall and leggy.

So, a few weeks ago I gave it a trim and stuck the cut stems in a cup of water.

This is my first attempt at propagating from cuttings, but it seems to be going well. Some of the cuttings are growing tons of roots!

Once they’re long enough (an inch long or more), I will put them each in soil and keep my fingers crossed that they continue to thrive. I’ve just potted up the first two, whose roots grew much more quickly than the others.
Kalanchoe cuttings with roots
It’s really simple to make cuttings yourself – snip off a stem, remove leaves from the lower portion of stem (roots will be growing out of the leaf nodes), and put them in water by a nice sunny window. Change the water once or twice a week to prevent rot. Soon, with luck, little white roots will start appearing.
Kalanchoe cuttings potted up
Lots of plants can be grown from stem or leaf cuttings, some more readily than others. You can also buy rooting hormone to speed up the process, but these cuttings have grown just fine without it.

It seems amazing to me that you can just cut off a part of a plant, and it will grow into a new separate child – a clone of its parent.

Aren’t plants incredible?

Joy PrimroseJoycelyn is a member of the Primrose marketing team.

She is a novice windowsill gardener but hopes to graduate to larger plants one day. She enjoys British food (despite its sometimes bad reputation) and British scenery.

At Primrose, when not tending to office plants, she deals with online advertising and social media.

See all of Joycelyn’s posts.

Caption needed – what is happening with this elephant?

Elephant with birds

We asked for captions on our Facebook page on Friday. Last time we received so many brilliant ones for the bunny rabbit that we couldn’t resist doing it again.

Here are the replies we received:

  • Are we half possom?
  • Are you ticklish?? ooh go on you know you are !!
  • I nose you don’t I?
  • Here… hold on to this n we’ll make a Trunk call to find your Mummy, but we’ll play until we do x
  • Wanna play with me?
  • Baby pals
  • “Ooh you smell nice”
  • Nope your not mine either lol xx
  • Here chick chick here chick chick
  • So your saying I’m not one of you?
  • No your not my mummy, no your not my mummy, nope your not my mummy. Mummy!!!!!!! Where are you?!
  • Who you calling big ears?
  • Give us a kiss!
  • Have you lost your mummy. do you want to make a trunk call?
  • Ur trunk is not as big as mine, why?

What do you think is happening on on the picture?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

What would your caption be?

The importance of pruning

Multicoloured RoseUnlike trees, a shrub can easily survive the lopping of its stems. Pruning stimulates growth and increases the vigour and productiveness of the plant.

To a plant, pruning is a stimulus. Although you have reduced its size by cutting it back, you stimulate the growth of buds on the plant that were once forced to be dormant by the dominance of the terminal bud.

Remove the bud and others below will start to grow resulting in a bushier plant.

What does pruning actually do?

Gardeners talk a lot of rot about pruning. They talk about all the plant’s energy being routed into certain directions and whereas this might be the end result, what is actually going on is the result of changes of hormone levels within the plant.

Large-sized, deep red Hybrid Tea roseEach bud, and the tip of each branch, as well as each flower, and in the roots too – as well as under the bark and deep in the branch, gives off a cocktail of hormones that determine how the plant will grow. If you remove a branch, the hormones produced by it are removed, and this has consequences for the rest of the plant.

So, if you cut the branch off just above a bud, the hormones from that branch that usually inhibit the bud from growing are suddenly removed, and the bud will start to grow!

Pruning can allow us to create a plant that will grow in a way we want it to, rather than how the plant might naturally wish to grow. And there are many advantages to this. You have to remember that a bud will grow in the direction it is pointing and therefore you can determine the overall shape of the plant.

For roses, one of the reasons for pruning is to cut down the amount of fungal problems by allowing the breeze to flow through the plant effectively. This is done by creating a plant that is goblet shaped.

When you are pruning you need to look. Which way is the bud you are cutting above pointing? if it is towards the inside of the plant, then choose another that points outwards.

Read part two – the practicalities of pruning.

Mr Digwell gardening cartoon logo

Paul Peacock studied botany at Leeds University, has been the editor of Home Farmer magazine, and now hosts the City Cottage online magazine. An experienced gardener himself, his expertise lies in the world of the edible garden. If it clucks, quacks or buzzes, Paul is keenly interested.

He is perhaps best known as Mr Digwell, the cartoon gardener featured in The Daily Mirror since the 1950s. As Mr Digwell he has just published his book, A Year in The Garden. You can also see more about him on our Mr Digwell information page.

See all of Mr Digwell’s posts.