Blazing Autumn Colours for Your Garden

Jersey Plants at Primrose

We’re excited to be teaming up with Jersey Plants Direct, whose beautiful autumn plants are available now on our website, with free delivery!

Summer’s fading light can easily make the colours in our gardens look a bit dull. With our new handpicked Jersey Plants Direct range, blazing autumn colours can easily enrich your garden for one last glorious time this year.

By planting brightly coloured bedding plants, such as wallflowers or pansies, you’ve got your garden’s autumnal needs covered.

Autumnal bedding plants not floating your boat? We have many more plants available on our site, including pond plantsexoticsrosesfruit treesspring bulbs and many more!

Of course there are also our 980+ planters to complement your new flowers!

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Advertisements

The Corpse Flower

Amorphophallus titanumOne of the latest additions to our range of plants, trees and bulbs is the amorphophallus konjac which belongs to the araceae family.

It is a unique plant in many ways – its looks are most certainly unique, but really it is known for its rather pungent smell.

We think it’s possibly the stinkiest flower we can grow in the UK and the smell – or perhaps that should be stench – has been compared to cheese, rotting fish, a sweet floral scent, mothballs, and several other equally pleasant smells.

Who would you gift this plant to?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

How to Make Patio Fruit Trees Work for Your Garden

The benefits of eating fresh fruit and vegetables are something that we are all well aware of. Eating our “five a day” has become a great benchmark for us all to adhere to as we try to stay fit and healthy.

Boost Your Fruit Intake

Eating vegetables is the easy part, as we can simply eat our greens with a tasty steak or chicken breast – but remembering to eat enough fruit is something many of us neglect.
Patio Fruit Trees
Often this will not be intentional, but will simply be because we are too busy to nip to the greengrocers or the supermarket to pick up a bag of apples or oranges. One way we can help to boost our intake of fresh fruit is to invest in a patio fruit tree. These can be placed in even the smallest of gardens or patios and produce fruit that is much fresher and better value for money than supermarket fruit.

Midget Fruit Trees

These are often referred to as dwarf or midget fruit trees and can be obtained from a number of garden centres and online suppliers. They are usually grafted on to a dwarfing rootstock – This stops them from getting too large but does not compromise the size of the fruit whatsoever.

Positioning and Care

In order to give your patio fruit tree the best potential for growth possible, it is prudent to adopt a south facing aspect. This has been known to produce the most abundant crops and should have your plant bearing fantastic fruit in no time at all. Plums, nectarines and peaches all flower at the start of spring so it is also a good idea to protect them from any lingering frost in the early months by covering them with a protective fleece or even storing them under cover. That said, pollinating insects should also be able to roam freely so allow access to your patio fruit trees from the garden.

Maintenance

If growing your patio fruit trees in garden pots, it is a good idea to use a good quality fertiliser during the spring and summer months.  This will ensure that any nutrients used up are replaced and that your tree will maintain its foliage and fruit. Also keep an eye on the compost during hot weather and make sure this does not completely dry out, as this could be detrimental to the amount of fruit that your midget fruit tree will produce.

Written by Alan Hamilton on behalf of Mirror Reader offers – the Daily & Sunday Mirror’s reader offers shop. Alan is a keen gardener who finds it hard to stay indoors, even in the harshest of winter weather.

Your New Year’s Resolutions!

london eye

Last week we asked you for your new year’s resolutions on Facebook and love the responses we got:

Cat:

Finally finish writing something!

Barry:

Carry out orders of Head Gardener less painful that way.

Jacqui:

To laugh more!

Jackie:

Stop my dog digging my lovely garden.

Captain:

Tonnes of them.

Judi:

More reading, more learning and more development for 2013.

Jennifer:

Yes I did make one…’I will not be sucked into bargain corners of DIY sheds’…. One tiny little trip this morning to B&Q for paint = No paint and 3 ragged Dicksonias later..

Liz:

NEVER.

Sheila:

Do more in garden if can . . don’t spend enough time on it.

Shirley:

Yea I did new diet lol cause I haven’t got a garden lol

Tracy:

Well I did a silly one. Mine was to stop telling everyone (who didn’t care) when my favourite footballer scores a goal. Worked well up to yesterday (New Years’ Day) when he decided to score 2 in the same match lol

Gabrielle:

This year I’m setting myself a little goal and planting a little veg garden and planting a few fruit trees.

Barry:

Add more plant to garage roof, snowdrops in flower, even have self-seeded verbena.

Jim:

Stay living in an attic flat…no digging…

Laura:

I have major plans to transform our garden into a fab sensory one for my son – just got to wait for the builders to stop churning it up first! I also have a very happy boy with his new bubble wall from Primrose – he is full of the horrible cold, but as soon as the runny nose goes I’ll get a photo for you.

Maggie:

To get the garden shed re-felted asap.

 

 

We wish you all good luck!

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Sunshine, Apples, and Stawberries

Pink Hyacinths close up

Isn’t it amazing how a dash of sunshine and a splash of rain can really kick-start the garden into ‘growing mode’? Taking advantage of the sliver of sunshine yesterday, I ventured into the garden to see how things were coming along.
Pink Hyacinths close up
The hyacinths are open, brightening up some pots with their gorgeous colours not to mention smelling divine. The weeds are romping away (much to my displeasure) but alas!
Purple hyacinths close up
My fruit trees are doing well; I must admit that due to the late frosts and heavy rain I was worried that none of them would start developing fruit after the blossom was so savagely ravaged but hey, I’m in the Scottish Borders and Scottish weather is usually wet and unpredictable, to say the least.

My dwarf apple trees are developing the odd couple of fruits; the one planted into the ground is doing much better than the other in a pot and for the first year ever my cherry tree has cherries growing on it! Needless to say, my boys and I are looking forward to tasting them once ripe. Though, my laid-back approach to the birds might have to go, as they’ve already been eyeing up my potential harvest! I’m thinking of trying bird netting — does anyone have any tips on how to deter birds without actually frightening them from the garden?

My strawberry plant has suffered quite a bit and after the fruits ripen I think I’ll have to replace it, poor thing is only in its second year but it hasn’t done well with the erratic weather at all so any suggestions on strawberry varieties suited to Scottish weather would be greatly appreciated. I hope we all get some decent weather soon!

Take care, Nicole :-)