Happy Easter from Primrose!

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With Easter practically on our doorstep we are all looking forward to nicer and warmer weather so we can spend more time in our gardens.

If your garden is anything like ours you will probably have quite a lot of cleaning up to do before you can really enjoy it.

We thought we would help you and show you our range of composters so you can dispose of your garden and vegetable waste whilst creating compost to be used at a later time. Available in various sizes they are functional and look great!

Of course it is also important to enjoy your garden once you’re done with the spring clean, but we still have some chilly days and nights ahead of us. If you can’t wait, why not take a look at our patio heaters.

Whether you’re looking for a freestanding heater or one to attach to your wall or ceiling, we’re here to keep you warm.

It isn’t just you and your garden that needs a bit of TLC at this time of year, but also your pond. Do you have enough barley straw to clarify your pond?

It is totally safe for:
  • Fish
  • Pondlife
  • Aquatic plants
  • Children

It is simple to apply and maintain – all you need to do is remove the plastic outer packaging, and put it in your pond.

“Barley straw… now recognised as the only effective product that can safely be used in ponds”

– Chris Beardshaw, ‘3 little gems’, Daily Mail.

Of course you have to be able to reach your pond. Our roll-out path makes navigation in your muddy and wet garden simple!

We also have a huge range of weed killers and pest control to tackle those not-so-pleasant problems.

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My New Veg Plot

Peas growing up a trellis

I awoke early the morning after my new veg plot was created. With just a little spousal assistance, a forgotten corner of the garden had been transformed into an accessible and useful space. With my vegetable seedlings bursting out of their pots I was eager to prepare for them a permanent home with room to spread their roots.

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Victoria’s Garden Buzz

Victoria's Veg Patch with Sprouting Broccoli

You should hear my garden, humming and buzzing with activity. You’d have thought our coldest April would have put paid to anything I’d planted early, but it’s as if nature simply went to sleep and woke up so fresh and revitalized that the herbaceous plants and vegetables are reaching double their usual height and you can almost watch them growing. How does your garden fare in this crazy weather?

What a difference a mow makes! After the cool spring rain the garden looked more like a meadow lush with daisies, buttercups and cowslips – it had been so long since it was cut. It was hard to see where the lawn ended and the borders began. Then, one hour with mower and strimmer, and it was a picture framed. Which garden task do you think makes the most difference, especially if you are short of time? Perhaps it’s weeding or pruning or hedge-cutting . . .

More rain! Never mind! The plants do so much better when nature waters them – somehow the rainwater penetrates plant and soil far more efficiently than a hose can. Plus, weeding is easier when the soil is wet and everything smells so nice. The downside? I can’t excuse myself from housework . . . although, there’s always something to do in the potting shed! How do you prioritise your time around your home or allotment?
Victoria's Veg Patch with Sprouting Broccoli
The purple sprouting broccoli lasted so much longer this year. It’s early June and I’ve just stopped picking it as it is in flower and will be too tough to eat – but just in time for the first broad beans. I have the baby pods whole and when the
first ones have set I pinch out the tops and eat those as greens – yummy stir-fry! I saw that one or two pea pods have set too. What spring vegetables do you look forward to most? How do you like them prepared?

Early last year in a bid to rid bindweed, I had my whole long border up. I divided and potted up perennials, put bulbs aside, pulled up as much of the pernicious root systems as I could and left them to wither and die! Then I dug in lots of my lovely garden compost and replanted. Last summer, the border looked glorious – this year even better – however, of course, the bindweed is back! Such is life. What is your worst weed? Have you managed to beat it?

Composting, I maintain, is a form of alchemy! Taking raw, base materials and turning them into black gold! I wonder who first thought of it – in primitive times, perhaps. My heap is six feet by three and growing as the garden matures.
Synergy, perhaps? I love the fact that the garden feeds itself and it’s a good place to put any slugs and snails I catch to help the process. Life, death, decay and life again: primordial recycling.

Victoria

Allotment and Garden Advice for August

August is a busy month for gardeners – the majority of the time in my garden has been spent watering! In most areas of the UK we’ve actually had a fair bit of sunshine this summer, which is marvellous for sunbathing but hard work for gardeners!

On the plus side, tomato blight seems to be thankfully absent this year – the warm dry weather is to thank for that. However we have had some short, intense periods of rain which have been fantastic for the plants, and also for the weeds!

If you are finding you are running out of space to compost the spoils of your weeding escapades, it may be time to invest in a compost bin! If you already have a bin, a compost rotation system involving two or more compost bins can be a very valuable addition to a well functioning and efficient garden. This system works by filling up one bin whilst the other gets busy composting. You can then empty one whilst the other is composting – fantastic!

Those of you who have been growing your own potatoes, broad beans and other veg will find that you have a constant supply of peelings and shells finding their way to the compost from the kitchen – we’ve found some fantastic compost caddies which can store uncooked kitchen food waste – especially useful when winter approaches and we all feel less inclined to visit the garden!

Tidying up the Garden

Green Garden Lawn Edging

Well it’s already February! The time has gone quickly and the snow from December is just a memory now. It’s also starting to get warmer down our way, we’re creeping towards Spring, so now it’s time to think spring cleaning for the garden!

I expect that after a few months of abandoning the garden and hiding inside away from the weather, your garden is looking like it needs a little TLC… So here are a few tips on how to get it back into shape! Weed Wand from Primrose Gardens

You can keep your garden looking neat and tidy by mark the boundaries of your flower beds with some stylish, affordable border edging. Border edging comes in a range of styles and looks great running along the edge between your lawn and flower beds. It’s flexible and can fit any length edge and is also a great way to prevent loose soil etc from spilling over from your flower beds onto your lawn.

Weeds can be the bane of a gardener’s life, and I’m sure a few will have popped up over the winter. It’s important to take special care when removing weeds that have grown up around your plants, but weeds growing on your driveway and patio can be dealt with very quickly and easily with a number of weed-killers such as sprays or an eco Weed Wand – instantly creating a much tidier area.

There are a great number of products to make it easier and quicker to clear up your garden. For example, if there are a lot of leaves and detritus clogging up your garden, a handy way to deal with this are leaf grabs which can scoop up the leaves in large volumes. And what do you do with all these leaves and other garden waste? Make compost! Composting is fantastic as it is not only great for the environment, but also provides a neat and free way to dispose of a lot of your garden waste (though don’t compost weeds!). Take a look at one of our earlier posts for how to make great compost.

Finally, where do you put all your garden tools, pots, planters and everything else when they’re not in use?

Storage is vital in any garden and will keep your tools and other items safe and protected while at the same time neatening up your garden. Greenhouses are useful storage areas as well as ideal environments for plants that require more warmth and shelter than our British weather can provide. Sheds are the traditional garden stores, though you may like to consider plastic garden stores instead since they are fully weatherproof and not liable to rot or succumb to damp. Many can also be opened by the roof as well as the doors, allowing easy use.