Seeking an Experienced Plants Communicator – £35k per annum

Primrose™ Pond in a Pot

One of the new Primrose developments – Pond in a Pot

An online garden retailer based in Reading is seeking to recruit a talented and experienced plants communicator to join our team.

Applicants need to be skilled and well versed with all flora. This is a great opportunity for an enthusiastic individual to join a company expanding their plants inventory. Established 12 years ago, the company is growing yet closely knit with a knowledgeable and friendly team.

Key responsibilities:

  • Able to hold one sided conversations with all types of plants.
  • Able to multitask – we have thousands of plants in stock ranging from spring planting bulbs, hedging and shrubs, bay trees, pond plants, exotic plants and fruit trees.
  • Able to speak using different dialects – some plants respond better to Scottish accents for example.
  • Able to react to changes needed, such as repotting plants into differently coloured planters if they indicate they don’t like the colour. You’ll need to have familiarity with our range of over 1000 planters to match the right pot to the plant.
  • Monitoring the success of the communications through monthly and ad hoc reporting.

Candidates ideally would be:

This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to take their plants knowledge to the next level and develop their career. Full support and on-the-job training provided.

Previous experience not required, but beneficial.

Pay will start at £35,000 – may be negotiable depending on experience

Please send your application or any queries to hello@primrose.co.uk.

Over 2600 Plants & Trees

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Here’s how to tackle your garden!

Garden Hand Tools from Primrose

Primrose Tool SetYes, we know it’s going to be bad weather this weekend, but you know as well as us that it’s time to get out there and get started in your garden!

Here’s a selection of our Primrose garden hand tools which are designed by gardeners for gardeners and perfectly up to the job.

We’re really quite proud of them and here’s why:

  • Lightweight yet strong – perfect even for kids
  • Durable and rustproof – so you can see your task through
  • Weatherproof – just in case you forget it in the English summer
  • Wood is FSC certified – wood is sourced responsibly

We’re so proud that we’re giving a 10 year guarantee on all of our wooden hand tools! Get digging now!

I have bought two garden products recently and both are top quality.

Primrose Greenhouses

Win a Cadac Gas BBQ worth £450!

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Cream is the new Green!

Lacewing Greenhouses at Primrose

The balmy summer evenings, the gorgeous sunshine – we just don’t want it to end. However, now’s the time to look forward, not back. It’s the season for planting and preparing for next year. Lay down the spring bulbs and harvest your delicious veg.

We thought we’d give you a bit of a helping push by introducing our new range or cream greenhouses – guaranteed to become a stylish centrepiece in your garden.

Available in a range of sizes and styles, these Lacewing greenhouses come with a minimum 2 year warranty with most rising to 10 years.

Unsure which greenhouse is perfect for you? Take a look at our comprehensive guide or the different categories:

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

September in the garden

The buddleia is growing over my chair and - even though I like it - orange pollen messes my shirt!

The buddleia is growing over my chair and – even though I like it – orange pollen messes my shirt!

People get themselves into a bit of a muck-mess when it comes to pruning trees – and any fruit for that matter! But in fact it’s quite simple and once you have the basic idea about what you are doing, it becomes second nature.

Always try to assess the tree, look for branches that make up the main skeleton of the tree, and leave these alone. However, pruning isn’t the same as lopping, and if your tree is too large, then the best advice you can get is to employ a tree surgeon to do the job.

The cost of a branch crashing through your greenhouse, or worse, is rather more than the cost of a day’s work. Never attempt to lop a large tree, wood is really heavy, and you simply will not have the correct equipment for the job.

That said, it is also hard work, and a few days (or longer) flat on your back on painkillers just isn’t worth it.

Winter density lettuces - one of those lettuces that, when you bite into it, let's you know you are eating a salad, it's so thick.

Winter density lettuces – one of those lettuces that, when you bite into it, let’s you know you are eating a salad, it’s so thick.

If you care cutting a branch that is more than an inch thick, use a saw. Always start underneath cutting upwards upwards. This stops the wood peeling off when the branch falls, which will be a site of infection. Usually branches are quite heavy, and when you get to the last few cuts it is prone to break uncleanly, or at best, peel back the bark on the stump. Cut as close to the main branch as possible.

You can finish off these larger cuts with wound paint, which acts as a plaster, keeping infections out.

All pruning should take place in the dormant season, when there are no leaves on the tree, and before the Spring, when the sap in the tree is rising and any cutting will cause the tree to ‘bleed’.

The garlic we grew - not so much, is drying, and we should be planting fresh soon.

The garlic we grew – not so much, is drying, and we should be planting fresh soon.

First of all you are protecting the plant from itself. When branches cross over and touch, they rub and bang in the wind, and this causes damage. Since fruit tree wood is particularly susceptible, we need to cut out the possibility of this happening, otherwise you’ll get fungal infections where the damage occurs.

Cut out any branches that overlap or touch in such a way to make sure the plant that remains looks like a goblet, or wine glass. This is the best shape for allowing the wind through the branches, cutting down humidity, and therefore lessening the chance of disease.

The second thing to do is to cut out any small branches that are facing inwards, ones that will, in later months and years, crown the inside of the tree and disrupt the constant flow of air through it. Or will touch other branches were they allowed to grow.

Take cuttings in September. Nothing makes you feel like a proper gardener, and you get free plants.

Take cuttings in September. Nothing makes you feel more like a proper gardener, and you get free plants.

This is the major part of pruning a tree. If you wish, you can now take off some of the height of the tree too, should you feel it necessary, but remember, taking out the terminal buds will cause more branching, which will probably need to be prunes out at a later date.

On fruit trees it is a good idea to reduce the number of fruiting buds, on each branch, so the plant isn’t overwhelmed next Spring. You can tell the fruiting spurs, they form a little mass altogether. Just cut out a few per branch, and this encourages better fruit next year.

Mr Digwell gardening cartoon logo

Paul Peacock studied botany at Leeds University, has been the editor of Home Farmer magazine, and now hosts the City Cottage online magazine. An experienced gardener himself, his expertise lies in the world of the edible garden. If it clucks, quacks or buzzes, Paul is keenly interested.

He is perhaps best known as Mr Digwell, the cartoon gardener featured in The Daily Mirror since the 1950s. As Mr Digwell he has just published his book, A Year in The Garden. You can also see more about him on our Mr Digwell information page.

See all of Mr Digwell’s posts.

How do you like them apples?

A successful apple harvest!Thanks to the delightful weather earlier in the year this year’s harvest looks to be phenomenal for the apples, berries, elderflowers and more.

Last week the Royal Horticultural society in Wisley said the icy spring and the hot summer had made for a “near perfect” apple harvest, with the weather conditions mimicking that of central Asia where they were first developed.

– The Guardian

Our managing director has several apple trees in his garden and yesterday started picking the first. Some even made it through to the office!

How are your apple trees looking?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.