Primrose visits the RHS Hampton Court Flower Show!

Rosemary went to the RHS Hampton Court Flower Show. These are some of her pictures.

It was particularly exciting to meet up with some of the nurseries that sell their plants on the Primrose website, such as Amulree Nursery [gold medal winners] and Taylors Clematis [silver-gilt flora winners]

What were your highlights?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

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Three Times Round the Chicken Coop – Head of Marketing beats the MD in annual wheelbarrow race

The MD is on the final stretchLast weekend saw the newly created annual wheelbarrow race for the Primrose staff.

The managing director and the marketing manager went head to head with wheelbarrows using the MD’s son as ballast.

The challenge was to see who could run fastest three times round the chicken coop.

The MD’s comments were:

The Marketing Guy chose a wider route with smoother corners, which may have contributed to his five second faster time, although I would like to point out that the Marketing Guy lost it at the first corner, spilling the precious cargo onto the grass and we had to restart the race.

So he didn’t really win at all.

The head of marketing commented:

I felt the precious cargo leant the wrong way to favour his father’s chances. However, running barefoot gave me an advantage and having shorter legs for shorter distance and start, the track favoured me.

Ultimately the MD got his revenge with a 3-0 thrashing at Table Tennis.

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Babies in the garden? No problem!

Babies in the garden can be a tricky issue. Whilst it may seem straightforward to just have your toddler or little crawler in the garden with you, there are plenty of dangerous situations they can encounter.

In celebration of the birth of the royal baby, we at Primrose wanted to share our safety for babies in the garden tips with the couple. If you’ve got a toddler or young children coming round for the first time, it might be prudent to do a risk assessment of your garden, too.

  • Buckingham Palace GardensWhilst Buckingham palace gardens contains vast spaces of perfectly cut grass, there are balustrades framing the large patio area. Do you have any areas a baby’s head can easily get stuck in? Check your fencing!
  • Water is intrinsically linked not only with royal gardens, but most gardens in London feature a water feature or a pond area. What about your garden? Is your pond secured to stop the little angel from investigating it too closely?
  • The royal gardens are maintained by an army of landscapers, but most of us look after our own gardens. How well do you know your flowers and plants? Any poisonous plants? Deadly nightshade, lords and ladies, certain laburnums can all cause problems if eaten.
  • St James's Park Lake – East from the Blue BridgeWe’re sure that the royal baby will be well looked after by people concerned with giving it just enough sun, but we all know life doesn’t always work that way. An easy way to protect your child from the sun’s harmful UV rays is a shade sail which also wards off the rain during those frequent summer showers.
  • We’re sure every parent wishes to have a royal butler’s assistance once in a while, even just to tidy items away. Garden tools often contain sharp edges and your little one can easily sustain an injury. Put them in the shed!

What are your garden safety tips? What have we missed out on?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

How To Care For Your Office Plants

National Plants at Work WeekIt might be the only member of the office team you can trust, it might hide you and your growing mound of paperwork from the eye line of your bosses or it might just be the only living reminder of a world outside, a garden and a life of greener things.

But the office plant really is one of the team, and deserves looking after.

So here are ten tips for keeping your plant really healthy:

1 – Let there be light

You need to ensure that your plant has sufficient light to be able to grow. Many offices, especially large ones have only low powered strip lighting, fit neither for plant nor beast. So if you want to see your plant doing well, get it as much natural light as possible.

Sometimes it’s a good idea to take you plant on holiday for a week to your home to get all boosted and pampered. If you want to keep your plant on the desk, move it for a few hours during the day to a window, but watch out for our next tip.

2 – Watch out for the radiators

Pink Orchid

In most offices, like most homes, the radiator is near the window – the coldest part of the room. Some offices have blown air conditioning. Both of these can be detrimental to plants, making them too hot, and drying them out more rapidly than normal.

Find a light source that is cool, without radiators and away from other electrical equipment.

3 – It’s not a plant stand

Computers and plants do not mix, especially where they are high powered machines giving off lots of heat and radiation. The number of accidents from spilt watering probably costs businesses more than they can afford, and probably a number of lost jobs to boot.

4 – Don’t overwater

Lucky BambooWe all do it, but interestingly more at work. People tend to overwater, thinking this is the way to keep the plant alive. If the compost feels slightly damp, it’s fine! Leave it alone.

Most plants do not want to be sat in a pot in a saucer of water – it’s not a cat, it’s a plant and waterlogged roots don’t encourage good plant health.

5 – Feed once a month

The problem with plants in pots is they run out of nutrients quickly, so once a month, give them a feed that is correctly diluted. Plants lacking nutrients look as though they are wilting, and therefore people simply give them extra water! Don’t, a feed a month is fine.

6 – Get to know your plant

Bromeliad TillandsiaThe most important part of any plant in office or at home is get to understand what it needs.

  • If it has thick leaves that look all spongy, it likes dry conditions.
  • If it has hairy leaves, it usually likes a wide pot, like St Paulias.
  • If it is blueish, it doesn’t particularly like bright sunlight all day long.

7 – Don’t put your brew next to your plant

This is the quickest way to destroy your plant. The heat from the cup causes local damage and the steam moistens the leaves. This causes a prime source of infection from fungi, and your plants will get sick.

8 – Repot and divide your plants

OrchidOnce a year move the plant to a bigger pot and give it fresh compost.

Learn how to divide your plant and you can give them away to other offices too!

9 – Keep them on a tray

In order to separate the world of plant from the world of desk, keep your plant on a tray, which will then cope with minor spillages and keep the whole area from disaster.

10 – Stop touching

daffodilsIf you touch, so will others, and during the course of the week the plant might easily become damaged from too much handling.

Some plants when touched, or worse, when broken, have a self help mechanism to make themselves look unpalatable to potential herbivores, so constant handling might well cause problems.

Take a look at the Primrose office plants and 5 ways indoor gardening will improve your life.

Mr Digwell gardening cartoon logo

Paul Peacock studied botany at Leeds University, has been the editor of Home Farmer magazine, and now hosts the City Cottage online magazine. An experienced gardener himself, his expertise lies in the world of the edible garden. If it clucks, quacks or buzzes, Paul is keenly interested.

He is perhaps best known as Mr Digwell, the cartoon gardener featured in The Daily Mirror since the 1950s. As Mr Digwell he has just published his book, A Year in The Garden. You can also see more about him on our Mr Digwell information page.

See all of Mr Digwell’s posts.

Don’t Be Afraid Of Big Leaves And Monster Plants

Amulree exotics garden design primrosePlants don’t just look pretty indoors or out – they also clean the air and add to the general well-being of any space they occupy.

Primrose have partnered with several nurseries to bring you a wide variety of plants ranging from everyday annuals and perennials to gorgeous exotics.

One of our nurseries – Amulree Exotics – is at this year’s Hampton Court Flower Show and their garden was featured on Monday night’s highlights episode on BBC1.

The thing I love about the tropical plants is just the effect that it gives you – the big leaves, the spiky leaves, it takes you to a different country and to a different time.

Planning the amulree gardenAmulree Exotics’ Simon Grindley together with garden designer Kevin Scales created a garden called ‘Don’t be afraid of big leaves and monster plants’ filled with exotic plants to showcase that even big-leaved exotic plants can be used in the smallest spaces.

There’s so many amazing plants out there that we weren’t growing here at the time so I felt it was my job to get out there and get ’em and bring ’em in.


Watch the Amulree nursery highlights on iPlayer.

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.